Help and Report Item Information

 
System Vendor Information

This section gives you information about the company that manufactured your computer, the type of computer (i.e. laptop or desktop), the model number, etc.

BIOS Information

Every computer has a BIOS. What is that? BIOS stands for Basic Input/Output System. It is used to control your computer at a very low level. Look it up on Wikipedia.

Battery Status

If your computer has a battery for portable use, this section will give you information on the status of your battery.

Windows Information

This section provides information about what version of Windows is installed on your computer, the serial number, and the currently logged in user.

Processor Information

This section gives you information your processor (CPU). It will tell you what type of processor is installed and give you details about its' speed and current load.

Hard Drive Information

This section gives you information about installed hard drives including the manufacturers and the capacities.

Floppy Drives

This section will tell you what floppy drives you have installed in your system. These are typically 3.5" floppy disk drives. On newer computers, you may not have a floppy drive installed at all as their use has been largely discontinued by computer manufacturers.

CD/DVD Drives

This section will tell you what type of CD or DVD drive you have installed in your system.

Mass Storage Information

This section will detail the storage capacities and available space for mass storage devices such as hard disks, recordable CD/DVD's, mapped drives, etc.

System Memory Information

This section will provide detail about the type of memory modules you have installed in your computer and their capacities.

Printer Information

This section will provide details about printers installed for use on your computer.

Device Ports

This section will provide details about the types of external hardware ports available for use on your computer. Look it up on Wikipedia

Keyboard Information

This section will tell you what type of keyboard is in use.

Mouse Information

This section will provide detail about the types of pointing devices are installed. Look it up on Wikipedia.

Drive Controller Information

This section will provide detail about the types of drive or disk controllers installed in your computer. Look it up on Wikipedia.

Bus Adaptor Information

This section will provide detail about the types of bus adaptors installed in your computer. Bus adaptors provide the interface between your computers processing system and storage devices.  Look it up on Wikipedia.

Video Adaptor Information

This section will provide detail about the types of video cards installed in your computer. Video cards provide the interface between your computers processing system and monitors or screens.  Look it up on Wikipedia.

Sound Adaptor Information

This section will provide detail about the types of sound processing adaptors installed in your computer. Sound adaptors provide the interface between your computers processing system and internal/external speakers, headphones, microphones, etc.  Look it up on Wikipedia.

Network Adaptor Information

This section will provide detail about the types of network cards installed in your computer. Network cards provide the interface between your computer and the Internet as well as network devices such as servers, other computers, printers, cable modems and DSL modems.  Look it up on Wikipedia.

ISP Information

This section will show your public IP address (the address remote Internet connections see), and the name and location of your ISP or network provider.

Modem Information

This section will provide detail about the types of modems installed in your computer. Modems provide communication interfaces between your computer and the Internet or other dial-up systems typically over common telephone lines.  Look it up on Wikipedia.

System User Information

This section will show what user accounts have been set up on your system and their status. Windows as well as some third party products create user accounts for specialized purposes. We recommend that you always disable the "Guest" account unless you have a specific use for it. Also, if you use the "Administrator" account, make sure you have a good password consisting of at least 10 characters using letters, numbers, and punctuation characters. These accounts are frequently exploited by hackers to gain access to your computer. If you see any other enabled user accounts that you do not recognize, we recommend that you disable them, or research them to determine if they are legitimate.

Anti-Virus Information

This section will show what Anti-Virus program you are using to protect your computer against viruses.

Firewall Information

This section will show what firewall program you are using to protect your computer against malicious attacks from outside your computer. Look it up on Wikipedia.

Default Browser Information

This section will show what your default browser is. Your default browser may be Microsoft Internet Explorer, Firefox, Opera, or another browser. This is the browser used by default when a web enabled document is launched.

Default Email Client Information

This section will show what program is set as your default email client. It is usually Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express. If you use another email program, it should be listed here. If you use only web based email, this section may or may not show a default email client. The default email client will be launched automatically by programs or web pages that are email enabled. Some programs that utilize this are MAPI enabled. Look it up on Wikipedia.

Microsoft Internet Explorer Settings

This section will detail the current relevant settings that may be useful in diagnosing connectivity issues.

Mozilla Firefox Settings

If installed, this section will detail the current relevant Firefox (a popular web browser) settings that may be useful in diagnosing connectivity issues.

Opera Settings

If installed, this section will detail the current relevant Opera (a popular web browser) settings that may be useful in diagnosing connectivity issues.

Running Desktop Applications

This section will what programs are currently running on the desktop. These would normally be the Windows applications you have launched yourself, such as your email client, web browser, etc. While these will also show up in the running processes section, they differ in that these are running under your login account and are usually interactive programs with a user interface that is displayed on your desktop.

Installed Hotfixes

This section will detail all Windows updates and hotfixes that have been installed on your computer. You can click on the hyperlinked Knowledge Base article number (KBxxxxxx) and this will take you to the Microsoft web site and display information about the update or hotfix.

Installed Programs

This section will detail all software applications installed on your computer. You should note that this list will include only applications and programs that have registered themselves as installed programs. It is not required that software publishers do this, but it is considered good practice. Some security products that are installed with stealth in mind will not register their applications as an installed (and uninstallable) program.

Installed Services

This section will detail all Windows services and display their status. Windows services are programs, however they are not like regular Windows programs. Services install at the system level and are always running unless they are disabled. They are loaded when Windows starts, and keep running whether a user is logged in or not. Generally, a Windows service is used by Windows itself, or by other applications that have components that must always be running.

Running Processes

This section will detail all software applications, programs, and services that are currently active on your computer. The data is organized in table format with several columns. If you are familiar with Windows Task Manager, you can think of this table as an enhanced snapshot of a Task Manager report. The information contained in the columns is as follows:

Process Name - This is the name of the actual executable program that is running. The process name is hyperlinked and clicking on the hyperlink will perform a Google search of that process name where you should be able to find out what that process actually does.

Version - The internal file version of the process executable.

Vendor - The name or copyright holder of the process taken from the internal file version information. The vendor name is hyperlinked and if you click on the hyperlink, a Google search will be initiated so you can get further information about the vendor.

PID - This stands for the Program ID. Whenever a program is started, Windows assigns it a number to represent the PID. Each time the program starts, this number will be different. If several copies of the same process are loaded, they will each be assigned a different PID.

CPU/s - This represents the total CPU (Central Processor Unit) seconds consumed by the process. It is displayed as hours:minutes:seconds.

Threads - This shows the number of threads the process is using. Windows programs can use multiple threads to perform several things at the same time. For example, an email program can utilize threads to check several email accounts at the same time. A good way to think of threads is that a thread is a mini-program inside a program. A program can have numerous mini-programs running internally at the same time.

Memory - This shows the total memory used by the process in KB (Kilobytes).

Handles - This shows the total number of handles used by the process. The concept of handles is difficult for non-programmers to understand, but basically handles are a reference to a certain position where data is contained in the computers memory.

Sockets - A socket is really an open network or Internet connection to another computer,  or one waiting to be connected to (listening).  If the entry shows a number of sockets greater than 0, then the process is either listening for a connection, or one (or more) are currently in progress. This is useful in determining how much network or internet activity is taking place for each process. If you see a large number of sockets being used by a process, it may possibly be a virus or other malware. High numbers of sockets being used usually deserves further investigation.

Registry Run Entries

This section will provide detail about all programs that are launched at startup that are not normal Windows Services. Windows provided a method where programs can be started whenever the computer is started and/or whenever a user logs in. Programs that are to be launched in this way are stored in special sections of the computers registry. The detail is provided in two parts. The executable process name is hyperlinked and clicking on the hyperlink will perform a Google search of that process name where you should be able to find out what that process actually does.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE - Programs listed here are run when any user logs in.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE - Programs listed here are run based on who the user is. They are specific to the logged in user and may be different for each user. LookInMyPC will report the entries for the current logged in user.

This is a favorite area for viruses to hide launching their executable code. If anything there does not seem familiar, then those entries deserve further examination.

Open Network Connections

This section will provide detail about all programs that currently have established network or Internet connections, or are listening (waiting) for something to connect. The data is organized in table format with several columns. If you are familiar with the Windows NETSTAT command, you can think of this table as an enhanced snapshot of a NETSTAT report. The information contained in the columns is as follows:

PID - This stands for the Program ID. Whenever a program is started, Windows assigns it a number to represent the PID. Each time the program starts, this number will be different. If several copies of the same process are loaded, they will each be assigned a different PID. The PID shown will be the same as PID for the process in the Running Processes section of the report.

Local Port - This is the port number that is open on your computer. This is also equivalent to a "socket". Each connection is assigned a to local port either by the application or by Windows.

Protocol - This column shows the IP protocol used, either TCP or UDP.

Remote Port - This column shows a 2 part "socket address". The left hand side (up to the colon ":") shows the remote computers IP address, and the right hand side shows the remote port number, or the port number you are connected to (or is connected to you) on the remote machine. Only TCP connections will show a remote port socket. UDP connections do not maintain them, rather they typically simply broadcast a message to one or more addresses. It is like calling someone on the phone, saying "hello", then hanging up. TCP is more like carrying on a full conversation.

Program Name - This column shows name and path of the program running that is utilizing the connection. You may have many instances of the same program name utilizing different connections.

State - This column shows the current state of the connection. Only TCP connections will show a state. UDP connections are considered "stateless" and will not show their current state.

Application Event Log

This is the first of three event log sections. LookInMyPC will report the past 24 hours of event log entries. Windows maintains event logs to log helpful information about what happens while the computer is being started up, shut down, and everything in between. The Application Event Log is where events worthy of being recorded are kept by applications, generally programs you have installed or that came installed on your computer.

Security Event Log

This event log is where security related messages would be stored. These might be user permission changes, unsuccessful attempts to log on the computer, password changes, etc.

System Event Log

This event log is where Windows stores all its' log entries generated by Windows itself. This section can typically show a lot of information. If you have a lot of Windows services running, you will see many references to these. You may also see status messages, clock synchronization messages, etc. It is sort of a central dumping ground for all the messages Windows generates, but are not displayed to users.

Loaded System Drivers

This section will detail what drivers are installed on your machine, along with their location on your system and whether they are currently in use..

File Paths

This section will show the location of all the Windows environment standard paths where certain types of files are stored.

Environment Variables

Environment variables are strings that contain information about the environment for the system, and the currently logged on user. Some software programs use the information to determine where to place files (such as temporary files).

File Associations

Windows maintains a table of file associations so that it knows what program to use to open each type of file. Each file has an extension after the name of the file, typically a period followed by 3 characters. This section lists all registered file extensions and the program they are associated with.

Last 10 System Restore Points (XP, Vista and Windows 7 Only)

Windows XP maintains system restore points at predefined intervals, or in some cases, when new software is installed, or old software is uninstalled. This is done so that in the case of a major computer problem, users can easily roll back to a point when the computer was known to be operating correctly.

 

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